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on that and say it's already here. so the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already
to take over the stem industry. that's the science, technology, engineering and math. she is a scientist at one of the leading biotechnology companies. she is the founder of next gene girls. this was started at the grassroots, an organization commit today empowering young women for under represented communities to see themselves in science by introducing the girls to the wonders and the many -- to wonder of the many different scienceses such as engineering, technology and math professions. this is a visionary woman i set before you and it is a privilege to be able to honor her. but a little bit about who she is. she was born in the most beautiful part of san francisco. she was reared in the most wonderful promising talented part of san francisco. and without any further ado, you guys probably guess it had. that's bayview hunters point. you got to give the lady some credit. so, mom and dad, thank you very much for raising outstanding woman. (applause) >> now, ms. jackson, she understands the roadblocks and challenges many of our young people face when it comes to growing up in a challenge
leadership for community impact. >> whereas the landmark 2010 aau study why so few, the women in science engineering in mathematics shows statistics women in this field. these barriers include stereo types, gender bias in the colleges and universities. the continue to block women's progress in these fields and offers recommendations to further open [inaudible] in 1998, aau launch a summer camp to help middle school 7th grade girls to continue their interests in engineering and math. despite [inaudible] to address the deficiencyings /tkepl -- demonstrated in the 2010 report. those girls that would benefit most from the program and as a reflection of this commitment to /soes owe economic diversity, the aauw [inaudible] week long residential camp conducted at stanford university and sonoma state universities and... >> whereas more than 150 [inaudible] unique program often setting them on an of the program have come from everett [inaudible] james [inaudible] martin luther king junior, [inaudible] clear lily, hoovers james lake, benjamin franklin middle school. each school receives copi
not be specific to one disease or organ system but could benefit everything, new ways of doing science. since i came out of the genoa genome project, always looking for examples like that. that is a great and wonderful, exciting thing to be able to do, to be able to try to steer this massive ship in a direction that will have the greatest public benefit in the shortest time. >> two years ago, i did interview with christopher hitchens. it may have been close to his last. he died later. i want to run this clip. [video clip] collins, who did the human genome project, and who under budget, we are on opposite sides of the religious debate. we became friends. we became friendly debaters, and he has taken a very kindly interest in my case and has helped me have my genome sequenced to look for a more perfect, identifiable match for a mutation that is peculiar to me. >> how did you become friends? >> as christopher said, we started out as debating about the topic of science and faith. are these world views compatible? for me, they are. as a believer, the opportunity to do science and see god's hands in
equalizer in our society. and as we talk about gender equality, gender equality in math and science is such a critical area. and i'm really pleased with such great honorees, but i'm focusing on an amazing, amazing teacher who began over 45 years ago at washington high school. and i think there's a lot of ego pride in our neighborhood. she is an amazing toeholder we are honoring for women's history month. her contribution is in the field of mathematics at washington high school, go back over 40 years. and she is always encouraging and challenging girls and young women to study advanced courses and to consider opportunities in majoring in math and science and going on to really apply their learning. but i think she's -- when i review the different comments about her from less experienced teachers and students, the words that come out are nurturing and supportive and just a really person that brings everyone together as well. one of the events that washington high does is the pie day or pi day. i know in the math department the teachers bring different types of pies. it is an atmospher
women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. >> i want to welcome all of you to this very full house and this wonderful celebration for women's history month to recognize the efforts of women in our great city and county of san francisco. women's history month is a time to appreciate the contributions of our women leaders in our communities who have been courageous in proving the quality of life for all san franciscans. since 1996, the san francisco commission and the department on the status of women ~ has recognized the vital work and contributions of women throughout our community through this program, and i would like to invite dr. emilie morasi who is the executive director of that agency to say a few words about the history of this event. >> thank you very much, president chiu. i am joined today by commissioner kay [speaker not understood]. i'd like to ask her to come on up. she's very familiar with these chambers, having served as clerk for many, many years. and if there are any other commissioners who joined us, please come on up. i have just returned from japan th
of the middle east, and extraordinary new ways of looking at science and medicine when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. the middle east where president obama is in the midst of a three day visit to israel it marks his first visit to the country as president, speaking in jerusalem today the prident urged israelies to make sacrifices in the interests of sustainable peace with the palestinians. >> israelis must recognize that continued settlement activity is counterproductive to the cause of peace. and that an independent palestine must be viable, with real borders that have to be drawn. >> rose: the president also affirmed that america will continue to stand behind israel. he made a targeted appeal to the youth in attendance. >> and today i want to tell you, particularly the young people, so that there is no mistake here, so long as there is a united states of america, atem lo lavat. (applause) you are not alone. >> rose: joining me martin indyk, director of
in which science and scientists played a central and vital role. the manhattan project, the thousands of physicists and other scientists who developed the atomic bomb was the most dramatic illustration of this, i think probably today almost as well known were the thousands of mathematicians and other sign b terrific work withers in england and washington, d.c. who broke the german e anything ma, cipher and other access codes. the very small group of parish parish -- british and american scientists who really turned the tide in the battle against the u-boats are not so nearly well known at all. but their contribution was, i think, every bit as vital not only in winning one of the most crucial battles in the war against nazi germany, but also for its lasting consequences in revolutionizing the very way military commanders think about war. for that matter, revolution eyeing the way quantitative an access could be apply today a host of practical problems in the business world through the new science patrick plaqueet and his -- blacket and his scientists created during the war, operational
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
-income communities. there is also a gender divide as well in math and sciences and we need our champions like gail [speaker not understood] to continue their work. and i just wanted to honor you for your over 40 years at washington high school. so, thank you so much and can we have a hand for ms. barrett. thank you. (applause) >> thank you very much, supervisor mar, for this great honor. and i thank dennis kelly and president of the usf and linda mag for attending and nominating me. ~ plaque i do want to thank last but not least my husband who is here who has put up with my an ticks for the last, i hate to say 40 years, but it has been 40 years. it's a job i really, really like doing and no day is ever the same. and every day presents new challenges and i embrace these. i just want to say i looked at many of these fine women who preceded me, and i would suspect hopefully they took math in high school and did not drop out. it's very important and it's [speaker not understood] filter for getting into the sciences. if you can't get through the filter called calculus, you get nowhere. and we really en
they were merely getting older. i want to talk about that science and how we try to apply in use it to helping people in need. first of all, i want to say that there is a special thing about this plasticity as it relates to ourselves. that is to say it is constructed on the basis of moment to moment association of things that go together or the things that are expected to occur in the next moment in time. one thing that always goes with everything we feel, everything we do, every act we have had, every thought is a reference to the actor, to the player, to the doer, and that references to ourself. all of that derives massive plastic self-reference. we have to construct and enrich a strongly center itself, a person, in our brain through its changing itself in a powerful, plastic way. we're also constructed through these same processes to attach to the other people, to the other things we are close to in life. that is the basis of the attachment of the mother to the child or the child to the mother. through millions of the events of contact and interaction, all of those counts in w
's engage on the science. let me hear what your arguments are and then let's respond to them. and i would ask in turn that you listen to what the scientific community has to say. it's perfectly fine to have a great conversation with many people about the science itself because the science is so robust at this point. i mean, we have basically known for over 20 years now that, and it actually boils down, for all the complexity of the science it's really quite simple. it's real, okay, climate change is real. it is mostly human caused this time. there have been climate changes over many millions of years in the past that had nothing to do with human beings. this time it's mostly being caused by our activities. third, it's going to be bad. in fact, it's bad now and it's going to get worse. fourth, there's hope, that there are lots of solutions already on the table that are in fact already being implemented in this country, communities all across this country as well as around the world. there's an enormous amount of work that we can do right now with things that we have in hand. and then last
with this amazing and inspiring group of women. thank you so much. i chose to apply my science and policy education towards sustainability. i have worked for more than 15 years in community forestry, conservation based development, water quality science, fixing national environmental programs and now working to harmonize to build a natural [speaker not understood] in san francisco and the bay area. i've been lucky to work with dedicated and really big hearted people. all of whom believe we can and should do more to reduce our ecological footprint and are working to figure out how. through my work today at spur and with friends of the urban forest, we're helping to move the city forward towards a more sustainable future where there are trees and sidewalk gardens everywhere, where we have zero carbon and an imminently [speaker not understood], not just preparing climate change, but doing everything we can to stop it. i have an [speaker not understood] policy science education and social responsibility and to get to do it here in san francisco where most people believe this is the right direction to b
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representative, urs, and i will introduce the science who led that team and acted as the consultant to recommend the design criteria and the dvs led the consulting to the tjpa to make sure that the recommendations coming from urs, were reasonable and prudent. and did not not over or under address, the concerns and the nature of the facility and more appropriate for the nature of the facility. widening the associates and specializes in particular, on structural and blast analysis, and vehicle force protection. they have one in 64 years of experience, in that arena since experience with federal laboratories, courthouses embassies, as well as working on the pentagon and many of the same facilities in the city of new york, where dvs has addressed general security issues. they have focused on blast and force protection on those facilities. also as part of the peer review and consulting team to tjpa is code consultants ink. cci, and they focus particularly on fire protection and fire life safety issues and were extensively involved in the peer review of the bus fire and train fire scenari
big enough to park cars in, plus good evening -- gadgets. >> looks like a science fiction movie set. the ideal buyer is somebody who is not faint of heart or light of wallet. >> if you don't want to make the upgrade yourself, there's actually a company specializing in do-overs of bomb shelters. the shelter is priced to move at just a cool half million dollars. >>> new video of the meteor that lit up the east coast. people all along the east coast said they saw a brief and bright light in the sky. this is a shot of the image in delware. now to more video of the meteor from virginia. nasa officials say the flash appears be a single meteor event. there were reported sitings from maine to south carolina. >>> nothing here, though. nice calm weather going on tonight. leigh glaser has a check of the forecast. >> leigh: certainly do a few high clouds overhead, that's it. all that live doppler hd is picking up. a few near san jose and a stream across the north bay throughout the course of the day. here you can see from the high definition east bay cam looking over the bay, you can see a few
. the science of win is just as biological as it is mental. take dog hammers, for one example. for women handlers who befriend their competition before a show. testosterone levels actually decrease. for men it continues to rise, fueling their competitive drive. ladies, don't fret. the science also shows that we are actually better at risk taking. here to help us and you identify your own competitive style and tip the odds in your favor is best selling author, the author of top dog. winning and losing. in the book you write from champion tennis players to nba students to army recruits to jeopardy contestants, even children just racing across the playground. women and men compete differently. how so? >> well, women are actually very good at judging the odds of whether they're going to win or lose. women are very sensitive to those odds. on wall street, female financial analysts, they're 7.3% more accurate than male financial analysts. a brand new study just this week showed that women-run hedge funds outperformed male-run hedge funds. all that ability to see the risk and be sense i have th
is the co- founder and chief scientific officer of post-it science. he heads the company's goal team that has for more than three decades. he has been a leading pioneer in brain plasticity research. in the late 1980's, he was responsible for inventing something that i hope to own on my own, and in plans to approve my hearing. in 1996, he was the founder and ceo of scientific learning corporation, which markets and distributes software that applies principles of brain plasticity to assist children with language learning in reading. we are plowing -- proud to have him join us today to take part in this forum. [applause] >> thank you. i want to one-upping the mayor and say that today is my 70th birthday. [applause] still alive and raising cain. i also want to say that i am a proud citizen of this city and a public servant at the university of california, in this city for more than 45 years. it is wonderful to be here and wonderful to be with you today. i want to say, before i start, that you should understand that i was permitted by the university of california on a leave of absence fro
to remember the life of retired political science professor ted norton, who passed away at the age of ninety on february 7th. his journey at san jose state started in 1960. nortons nephew, steve rule, says since then sjsu was his uncles home. i really now as i get to know the situation better and hear the kind things that were said about him today is just i realize that this was truly his family and i think he would want everyone to remember him that way and to remember san jose state the same way. this is a community and a family and i think he was proud to be on it. peter buzanski, who once shared an office with norton, says his frien and colleague brought big changes to the university. he fought very hard to turn this university into a liberal arts university, know he had a great deal of help from president robert clark. today sjsu is a liberal arts school. norton used his modest professor salary to fund multiple endowments to help faculty and students. he gave virtually all he had back to this university and that is a very rare thing, that shows the kid of generosity he had he also did a
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near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30
of behavioral science? >> i think i do not want a may wore who is a behavioral scientist ex-pairmenting. the point, we should just have the death penalty for smokers. >> they do have a death penalty self-induced. >> everything you can do to try to discourage behavior all comes down on the smoker. there is lots of behavior are that is worse. i praise the mayor for the campaign against teenage pregnancy as he calls it. the problem is unwed pregnancy and the liberals in the new york times upset about the shaming campaign. shaming clearly works. liberals love shaming. >> i agree. >> they love stigmatizing. when they pretend to be wednesday unwed motherhood they can't against it or allow stigmatizing. >> geraldo: before we get to liberals being against the stigmatization of unwed pregnancy stick to the cigarette displays. is the mayor right and isn't this is a giant step in the nanny state it. >> yes, and like big gulp. i think people are aware. i always claim i don't believe the studies on smoking but i'm joking. people snow smoking is bad for you and all of the stick the worldc
, social studies, science and technical subjects in common course state standards and also to highlight and amplify key language [inaudible] that are critical for el's to succeed in school while they are developing english. tonight you'll hear a little bit about our work to date. so the purpose is also to provide opportunities to en/hreurb learners to access and engage with -- in light of the next generation content standards. it's critical that this be a tool that is deeply understood and used by all teachers. we've been engaged in making this happen with our partners from humanities and math and sciences. so we're gonna talk just briefly about the key shifts in the 2012 california eld standard. so on the left is reflecting the old standards and the right side is really representing that shift in what the new standards are providing with in terms of opportunity for our english learns and how we work with them. and i'll just highlight a couple of each slides. the first one i'm gonna talk about is the use of simply fied text and activities /a*ufpb separate from content knowledge.
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
. masters in science, ph.d. in para cytology of tulane university, post doctorate work at rice university, medical degree from the university of pennsylvania in my hometown philadelphia, resident in medicine and fellowship in critical care in anesthesia from ucsf. she joined the ucsf faculty in 1990. in 1999 she was appointed chief of anesthesia at san francisco general, a position she held until 2005. in 2004 she was appointed associate dean. besides currently serving as vice dean, she is also currently a professor of clinical anesthesia and medicine where she is educating the next generation of doctors at ucsf. in her time at ucsf dr. carlysle has won numerous awards, including the stuart c. colin award for clinical excellence and faculty clinical award, the elliott rapoport award for%backerfor commitment to san francisco general, and chancellor's faculty award for the advancement of women. for decades ucf doctors like dr. carlysle have staffed and run san francisco general hospital providing serve isx for people all over the city including many of our lowest income and at-risk resident
is cyber bullying and the top scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a
find the answer in science, it leads to more questions. that is part of the fun. there are two aspects that are extremely strange, one is the power specter. it is as if you were listening to music and there was and i don't and the song. that is something that we see in the distribution of the spots on the cosmic mac background. and there is an even more i the thing, which is it seems to be tilted sort of in the plane, as if you were on a large ship and decided to leave your head. it is very odd. >> what does all of that mean? does it mean that the findings you are disputing ord is reorganizing how we think about the universe? >> it is probably reorganizing the thinking. this is a big discovery and science because we scientists like to put out theories. dairies are the best explanations of the data we have. -- theories are the best explanations of the data we have, but when we get new data, it means new theories. >> does it matter, we are talking 14 billion years, 15 billion, does it matter that it happened before we thought it happened, the big bang? >> let me make an analogy. suppose
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> greg: let's find out if we have gotten anything wrong so far. for that we go to tv's andy levy. let's have some fun, right? >> no. >> greg: i was kind of hoping. >> you did not hire me to have fun. you you hired me to kill fun and i do a damn good job of it. >> greg: you do. you treat fun like roaches. >> i do. department of education website features quote. you agreed with greg bernie that this could only happen in the obama administration. >> of course. >> if the website automatically generates quotes from a database of quotes last updated in 2007 you real illini what this means, right? >> greg: they are blaming bush! >> this is bush's fault. >> greg: they are blaming bush! >> he is right actual. >> i we corrected. >> you are right. >> greg: amazing. >> an infiltrator no doubt. >> greg: time traveler. it was a time traveler. >> a fellow traveler. >> greg: i got about you. >> that is not even what i meant. >> greg: okay. a little play on fellow traveler. >> greg: ,
in forecast, what physics meteorologist and the natural sciences can teach us about economics, physicist explain the ebb and flow of market of economy can relate to science. look for the title in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near too future on booktv and booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here's a look at the prime time lineup for tonight. .. now author sara carr explores the results of the state legislature's decision shortly after hurricane katrina to re-assign control over the majority of new orleans public schools to the recovery school district, administered by the state. by following a student, teacher, and a principal as they traverse different segments of the education until system. this is a half an hour. >> it's great to see so many people out tonight who do such amazing work for kids in new orleans, and thank you for coming. i'm just going to talk for about 10 or 15 minutes or so and then take questions, and there's some people here tonight who are in the book and they might be willing to answer your questions during th
their children's health. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler has more. >> reporter: parents may think they are doing the right thing but doctors say the growing problems of diabetes may be caused by infant diets. >> reporter: he gets only breast milk. but a new study found 40% of babies under 40 months are getting solid food. >> mashing up fruit with rice cereal. >> sometimes you like them to have solid foods because they sleep better. [ laughter ] >> under 4 months we need to make it clear that has been shown to be related to higher risks of asthma. >> diabetes. each baby is unique but the ability to digest develops slowly. they recommend solid food only after six months. but 93% of babies by then are already eating solids, most with doctor approval. >> maybe give them cereal to start out with. >> reporter: he recommended daily cereal but the parents say they will wait. reporting live, health and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> once it is authenticated a work out could be a new world record. [ music playing ] that is a lot of hula hoops. the listing is for the mos
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's national laboratories. it was titled, the sequester is going to devastate u.s. science research for decades. they said this drop in funding will force to us cancel all new programs and research initiatives, probably for at least two years. is that going to put a damper on our future prospects? >> if the sequester holds in its current form for the ten years that it is supposed to, then yes, the answer is there will definitely be horrible consequences. i think before we go to the bad news, you need to give a little context. the good news is that america has been investing in research and development. it has been investing in science and technology at a very high rate. in 2009, thanks partly to the stimulus, the u.s. investment matched the previous high at the space race at 2.9 of gdp. that amount of money being poured into public and private research. so we've come down a little because of the budget cuts already put in place and we've come down much more because of the sequester. that speaks exactly to what i was argue ewing in my special report. the federal government tends to either not re
the science and business of addictive food with, author michael moss, coming up next. ♪ i'm your venus [ female announcer ] what does beauty feel like? find out with venus embrace. every five-bladed stroke gives you 360 degrees of smooth for goddess skin you can feel and feel. ♪ i'm your venus only from venus embrace. otherworldly things. but there are some things i've never seen before. this ge jet engine can understand 5,000 data samples per second. which is good for business. because planes use less fuel, spend less time on the ground and more time in the air. suddenly, faraway places don't seem so...far away. ♪ earning loads of points. we'll leave that there. you got a weather balloon, with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just about anything. go. ♪ keep on going in this direction. take this bridge over here. there it is! [ man ] so i used mine to get a whole new perspective. [ laughter ] [ male announcer ] earn points with the citi thankyou card and redeem them for just about anything. visit citi.com/thankyoucards to apply. ♪ the middle of this special mom
in computer science. he said, come look at my computer lab, i went to his computer lab and he had the big machine and it looked impressive to me. i had a mac at home. he said let me show you something, it's the first time i saw the worldwide web. it showed exhibit and had picture and text. as far as i knew the internet was text. i said, james, if you can have text on the computer why can't we have a newspaper on the web? i said that and he said, well, maybe we should something like that? one thing lead to another and the times started a task force of online. they put out the first website in january '96, i became the first editor of the website. so i changed completely from the traditional journalist to a website journalist, it was quite an education for me. >> do you want know keep going and going? tell me. let me tell you a little bit about the conclusion. i shouldn't tell you too much. i want do you buy the book. [laughter] this is what happened. to have a book like this, you expect that you're going have a know where it comes out. the reporters at the time told me we were going come o
of the subcommittee on commerce, justice, and science. thanks for being here. i want to first get a sense of where we are in the investigation. the fbi. how soon do you expect it will be revealing the contents? he tried to leave the kutcher for china. >> he's in prison. he's in jail. they should be within the next couple of days. lou: we listen to fbi director muller talk about how serious the problem has become. i have a strange feeling that if we did not have your voice on this right now there would not be a discussion of what is happening in nasa. various science centers, our national laboratories, and the full breadth of what is the chinese spying efforts of all sorts in this country, not just simply cyber spying, but 3500 from companies. this is a major threat against this country. >> it is a major threat. every major american company has been hit with a cyber attack. everyone. i have seen the list. the university's, foundations, major law firms. they hit my area. they took everything off of my computer a few years ago. people have been reluctant to speak out about it. what is so shocking and ma
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